Leiden University
Lorentz Chair

Lorentz Chair since 1955

2017

Renata Kallosh

2016

Charles L. Kane [lectures]

2015

John B. Pendry [lectures]

2014

David Gross

2013

H. Eugene Stanley

2012

Subir Sachdev [lectures]

2011

Roger Penrose

2010

Thomas A. Witten [lectures]

2009

Kip S. Thorne [lectures]

2008

F. Duncan M. Haldane [lectures]

2007

Thomas W.B. Kibble

2006

David R. Nelson

2005

Peter Zoller [lectures]

2004

Leonard Susskind

2003

Leo P. Kadanoff

2002

John P. Preskill

2001

Howard C. Berg

2000

Chandra M. Varma

1999

Michael V. Berry

1998

Frank Wilczek

1997

Bertrand I. Halperin

1996

Yoseph Imry

1995

N. David Mermin

1994

Julius Wess

1993

Michael E. Fisher

1992

Alexander F. Andreev

1991

Pierre C. Hohenberg

1990

Bernie J. Alder

1989

Martinus J.G. Veltman

1988

Claude Cohen-Tannoudji

1987

Raymond L. Orbach

1986

Philippe Nozières

1985

Ben Widom

1984

Chen Ning Yang

1983

Irwin Oppenheim

1982

Léon van Hove

1981

Ryogo Kubo

1980

Anatole Abragam

1979

Ezechiel G.D. Cohen

1978

Pierre-Gilles de Gennes

1977

Victor F. Weisskopf

1976

Rudolph E. Peierls

1975

John Bardeen

1974

Roy J. Glauber

1973

Nicolaas Bloembergen

1972

Felix Bloch

1971

David Pines

1970

Lars Onsager

1969

Isaak M. Khalatnikov

1968

Elliott W. Montroll

1967

Christian Møller

1966

Herbert Fröhlich

1965

Wladyslaw Opechowski

1964

Oskar Klein

1963

Mark Kac

1962

Léon Rosenfeld

1961

Elliott W. Montroll

1960

John H. van Vleck

1959

John G. Kirkwood

1958

Walter H. Heitler

1957

Eugene P. Wigner

1956

John A. Wheeler [reminiscence]

1955

George E. Uhlenbeck

» portrait gallery « of Nobel laureate Lorentz professors

Each year an eminent theoretical physicist holds the Lorentz Chair. The 2017 Lorentz professor is Renata Kallosh, from Stanford University. Her stay in Leiden will overlap with the visit of professor Andrei Linde, and they will jointly organize the Lorentz Center workshop on Theoretical Approaches to Cosmic Acceleration (3-7 July, 2017).

Professors Kallosh and Linde will give three lectures on "From Cosmological Observations to Fundamental Physics"
June 15, 22, and 26 (13:45-15.30 hours).
Location: De Sitterzaal, Oortgebouw.

In addition, she will present a Colloquium Ehrenfestii on Wednesday evening May 31.

Topics of the three lectures:

According to the cosmological observations during the last two decades, 70% of matter of the universe is in a vacuum-like state with positive energy density. This vacuum-like state is similar to the state of matter required for the exponential expansion of the universe in inflationary cosmology. Historically, it was difficult to describe positive vacuum energy (cosmological constant) in supergravity and string theory, but in the last 15 years new tools have been developed to address this issue. Similar tools, based on string theory and a non-linear realization of supersymmetry, also help with constructing realistic inflationary models. New observations confirmed the basic predictions of inflation: flat geometry, Gaussian inflationary fluctuations with a nearly flat spectrum. The Holy Grail of observational cosmology is a detection of primordial gravitational waves, B-modes in the CMB polarization. Our goal is to develop inflationary models in string theory/supergravity, which can successfully describe new observational data. We will discuss a general class of inflationary models which are compatible with all presently available data. These include the alpha-attractor models based on the hyperbolic geometry of the internal space. They provide specific B-mode targets for the future CMB Stage-4 and satellite missions, such as LiteBird, Pixie, and CORE. These new experiments could potentially probe fundamental physics, including quantum gravity, at energies up to 10^13 GeV. The theoretical developments in this area may shed new light not only on particle interactions at extremely large energies, but also on the origin of the universe and its global structure.


Signatures of the Lorentz professors on the wall of our old colloquium room.